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'Move to Canada' trends on Google after Brexit vote

By Ted Rath, Postmedia Network

In this photo illustration a European Union referendum postal voting form, waits to be signed on June 1, 2016 in Knutsford, U.K.  (Photo by illustration by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

In this photo illustration a European Union referendum postal voting form, waits to be signed on June 1, 2016 in Knutsford, U.K. (Photo by illustration by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Better hurry up, Brits. The anti-Trump migrants are already taking up all the good igloos. Once again, in the aftermath of the U.K.'s vote to leave the European Union, those who lost the vote appear to be seeking a common Plan B: move to Canada.

Data from Google Trends show a sharp spike in "move to Canada" searches coming from Britain -- 100 times more searches compared to 24 hours earlier.

"Moving to Canada, the only remotely sane place in the world as of now," tweeted one dissatisfied Brit after the 52% Leave vote.

The search was popular in Wales, followed by England and Scotland. Wales and Scotland voted overwhelmingly in favour of staying in the European Union.

The Canada search was a clear favourite, beating out British searches looking into other places to move, such as the United States or Australia, making the Great White North the No. 1 dream destination - once again - of political losers.

During the U.S. primaries, American Google searches for "move to Canada" hit record numbers, too, as Donald Trump opponents watched his popularity rise.

Riding that wave, Destination Cape Breton pitched the Nova Scotian island as a Trump-free paradise, and at least one dating site tried to hook up Trump-hating Yanks with like-minded Canucks.

Despite the threats, statistics suggest very little change in immigration numbers from Western countries whose citizens threaten to move here for political reasons.