News

Fourteen properties in latest tax sale

By Monte Sonnenberg, Simcoe Reformer

This property at 130 Colborne St. S. in Simcoe is  on the block in Norfolk County’s latest sale for tax arrears. Fourteen properties are in play, with Nov. 9 being the deadline for filing bids. MONTE SONNENBERG / SIMCOE REFORMER

This property at 130 Colborne St. S. in Simcoe is on the block in Norfolk County’s latest sale for tax arrears. Fourteen properties are in play, with Nov. 9 being the deadline for filing bids. MONTE SONNENBERG / SIMCOE REFORMER

SIMCOE - 

After taking a break this summer, Norfolk County is back with yet another round of properties that are up for sale for tax arrears.

The latest sale is among the largest Norfolk has staged since it adopted the direct approach on tax arrears nearly three years ago.

Fourteen properties are on the block, many of them homes and businesses.

Tender forms are available at www.Tri-Target.com or by contacting the treasury office at Governor Simcoe Square in Simcoe.

The deadline for filing bids is 3 p.m. on Nov. 9. Tender documents will be unsealed and read aloud at Governor Simcoe Square at this time.

The following properties are affected:

• 905 Forestry Farm Road. The minimum bid to obtain this property is $20,183.83.

• 13 Alice St. in Waterford. Minimum bid: $30,392.48.

• 40-42 Robinson St. in Simcoe. Minimum bid: $45,403.30.

• 454 East St., Delhi: Minimum bid: $32,983.35.

• Vacant lot, McDowell Road East. Minimum bid: $8,461.48.

• 38 New Lakeshore Rd., Port Dover. Minimum bid: $75,736.92.

• 101 King Lane, Simcoe: Minimum bid: $59,436.84.

• 44 Robinson St., Simcoe. Minimum bid: $32,774.57.

• 130 Colborne St. S., Simcoe. Minimum bid: $18,162.08.

• 691 Norfolk St. S., Simcoe: Minimum bid: $12,846.91.

• 300 Colborne St. N., Simcoe: Minimum bid: $26,149.57.

• 2808 Lakeshore Rd. Minimum bid: $15,125.51.

• 1057 Bay St., Port Rowan: Minimum bid: $12,243.74.

• 785 Norfolk Rd. 28. Minimum bid: $13,693.64.

The minimum bids represent accumulated taxes, interest penalties on the same, and the county’s administrative costs for managing arrears files.

Under Ontario law, property owners, mortgage holders and anyone else with an interest in these properties can halt the tax-sale process at any time up to the point of deed transfer by paying off the outstanding amounts.

The law is structured this way because municipalities and the province aren’t interested in seizing properties. Rather, they are interested in collecting revenue due municipalities under the province’s property tax system.

Since Norfolk embraced the tax sale process, the vast majority of properties have been redeemed before the tender documents are opened. Arrears have also fallen from a high of $13 million at the beginning of the program to about $9 million today.

MSonnenberg@postmedia.com